The Nerd Journals

Filling up journals as proof of my meager existence.

Incoming September; Outgoing October

I spent some time over today and yesterday replying to the snail mail that I’ve collected since mid-September. If you see a letter you sent me in the pile above, I have finally made the time to sit down and reply to you. Expect something from me within a week. I’m also sending out an unexpected surprise for someone- I hope they like what I send!

Choosing a new journal for autumn

For me, the satisfaction of completing a journal and the excitement of beginning a new journal comes with the in-between stress and anxiety of choosing the next notebook that I will use.  My favorite season is just around the corner so currently, I am waffling between these five earth-toned and autumn feeling books.

Freshly Revamped: The Nerd Journals

It’s been quite a while since I’ve had a blog that actually requires blogging. It was entirely too easy to lose myself on Tumblr where I could curate content with a single click of a reblog button. The reblogging life isn’t for me anymore and I am going to reignite my online pretense by creating my own content.

I plan to blog about what creative things I’m up to with my primary focus, of course, being journaling. I want to write some reviews for products and create photo galleries of images from my journals.  I have a few more fun ideas as well but I would like to leave at least something for a surprise.

If you have suggestions of things you would like to see on The Nerd Journals, if you have any questions for me or any topics you would like me to blog about please reach out to me.

Reincarnation Blues

4/5 stars

Thank you to NetGalley and Del Rey Books for an advanced reader copy of this book in exchange for an unbiased review.

Reincarnation Blues was a pleasure to read. It’s about a man living the last of his 10,000 lives; trying to live a perfect life. This book allows you have a look at some of the lives that Milo lives in between romantic trysts with Death (Suzie).

Milo at the end of the world (before the meteor strikes Earth) is my favorite Milo, and I would love to read an entire book about him, his wife and his daughter. It was also fun to read about Suzie having somewhat of an existential crisis in regards to her job.

This book was a bit longer than it needed to be to get the point of the story and the philosophy across to the reader, but I liked it.

Artemis

4/5 stars

Thank you to NetGalley and Crown Publishing for an advanced reader copy of this book in exchange for an unbiased review. Admittedly, though, my review may be a little skewed because I went through a tumultuous time in my life while reading this novel- the first half, anyway. By the time I got to the second half my messy life had calmed down a bit and coincidentally I enjoyed the book much more than I had previously.

This book is fun and modern in its story- I love the sci-fi tech and the city on the moon. I love that the main character is a female Muslim who is sex-positive and is doing less than legal things that I would more likely picture a male character doing. Jazz Bashara is an awesome character and she’s strong and independent with morals and values when they matter. She’s also looking out for numero uno (herself!) first and foremost. I really like Jazz, she seems mostly good natured and the type of woman I could throw a few drinks back with.

To make a million slugs (slugs = moon money), Jazz makes a deal with a billionaire to do some destruction to help him make even more money by taking over a contract. It’s a lucrative proposition that Jazz can’t resist. This story is about her destruction and what comes next.

If you liked The Martian I definitely recommend Artemis as well. I just wish it didn’t take me so long to find interest in this book. Halfway is just too long to have to read before a book gets exciting. Once again, however, that might just be because of my own things happening.

As a side note, I love the cover of this book.

The Running Man

5/5 stars

I went in thinking this book would be like The Long Walk by Stephen King (which I also really enjoyed) but I was pleasantly surprised that the books don’t have much in common at all, so don’t start reading this book expecting The Long Walk.

The country is in economic despair with the poor not being able to afford food or medicine and are controlled by “FreeVee” the mandatory to own (but not mandatory to watch… yet) television that airs game shows 24/7 to entertain the masses and keep their attention away from what’s happening outside their own windows- pollution so bad that it’s causing young children to die of lung cancer.

To afford his daughter’s medicine, Ben Richards tries out to be on a game show on FreeVee to win cash. Richards is run through several tests and put into a game show called The Running Man where the objective is to run from the Hunters who are out to kill him. He earns $100 for every hour he survives and a bonus for every officer or Hunter he kills along the way. Meanwhile, viewers can earn money by capturing Richards on video or giving a tip that results in his capture. It’s not an easy game; it’s rigged and no one has ever survived thirty days resulting in the prize of one billion dollars.

The Running Man is a very good book, fast pace and I couldn’t put it down. If I didn’t have to sleep between readings, I would have read the entire book in one sitting.

Art on the Rocks

5/5 stars

Thank you to NetGalley and Walter Foster Publishing for an advanced reader copy of this book in exchange for an unbiased review.

This book is a very detailed guide for rock painting. The author tells you the tools you need, where to find rocks and how to prepare them, and how to finish them with varnish. The author is also very informative with step by step directions on how to paint designs ranging in difficulty from beginner to expert. Using this book you will learn how to paint beautiful mandalas and other artwork on smooth rocks of any shape. Art on the Rocks is filled with gorgeous photography of inspiring artwork.

Landscape With Invisible Hand

3/5 stars

Thank you to NetGalley and Candlewick Press for sending me an Advanced Reader Copy of this book in exchange for an unbiased review. I requested this book because I recently read Feed by MT Anderson and I enjoyed it so I thought I should give this book a chance, too. While I didn’t like Landscape with Invisible Hand as much as I did Feed, this book does have its moments.

This book started strong but got a little muddled along the way, as if it didn’t know what kind of book it wanted to be. It was sci-fi that toyed with a romance story that didn’t quite fit comfortably into the overarching storyline. A few things didn’t make sense. This book was also satirical touching on topics such as immigration, socio-economic divide, and it also made fun of the political logic that if poor people are so hungry, they should go get jobs instead of begging for food they didn’t work for.

I know what it’s like to be Adam for a lot of this book; the hardships of being poor and trying your hardest to bring money into your home to feed your family. A father who walks out on you and your family. Hoping for something that will come along and save you financially. I want to talk about the end a bit more since it was so charming for me, but I don’t want to include spoilers so I guess I’ll just stop here.

Overall, a decent book that I mostly enjoyed. I still might try reading more MT Anderson in the future.

The Blackout

1/5 stars

The only reason I am not giving this book 5 stars (it’s truly an amazing story) is because Jean M. Auel overly enjoys writing unnecessary sex scenes, especially when you consider that at least one of said scenes were about mammoths having sex, and our two travelers (Ayla and Jondalar) being intensely turned on by this. Wtf.

HOWEVER, if you skip past the sex scenes this book is beautifully written, incredibly descriptive and educational at points, and the heroine of the novel is absolutely stunning.

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