The Nerd Journals

Filling up journals as proof of my meager existence.

4/5 stars

I love a good sci-fi book with time travel and I’m very interested in human psychology so this book was right up my alley. It introduced some very interesting time travel concepts and the mystery kept me reading quickly. I loved that time travel was created by four women and it was interesting how they ceased contact with one of their own to save face after sweet Barbara lost her mind while time traveling. It was such a lovely book, I enjoyed everything about it EXCEPT for all of the point of view changes, which did make this book confusing at times.

Hope Never Dies

4/5 stars

Thank you to NetGalley and Quirk Books for giving me a copy of Hope Never Dies to read and review honestly.

This book is a campy fanfiction turned full novel and I enjoyed it immensely. After their second term in office is over, Joe Biden and Barrack Obama go their own separate ways. While Barrack is windsurfing and skydiving around the world with famous celebrities, poor Uncle Joe is home feeling left out by his old buddy Barrack.

Fortunately, they reunite to solve the mysterious death of Joe’s old friend. The antics the boys got into kept me laughing and turning page after page. The best thing about this story is that it is actually well written and decent. My only complaint is that a lot of things said and done by the main characters don’t seem accurate to their real-life counterparts, but I was able to turn off the nagging voice in my head to keep reading.

I hope to read more in a Biden/Obama mystery series!!

The Carhullen Army

3/5 stars

While I did like this book I need to begin this review with why it could have been so much more, which will be difficult to explain without spoilers so please, I do my best to not spoil but tread lightly if you are thinking of reading The Carhullan Army.

The most exciting part of the story was skipped over and while I get that the part I am referring to wasn’t necessarily a part of the story was author was telling, it would have added a nice bit of action and closure to what is truly a lovely story about a woman escaping what her life has become to a life that was her choice and not chosen for her.

The woman we know only as Sister decides to leave her husband in her home in war-ravaged Britain, deciding to no longer live under the eye of The Authority and their oppressive regime and mandatory contraceptive devices. She makes her plan and prepares as meticulously as possible for her escape to the all-women commune in Carhullen. This is the story of Sister’s escape, her earning her place with the “unofficial women” to finally doing what needs to be done.

I just wish that “what needs to be done” was a bit more of the story than the author wrote.

GoodReads Beta App

Were any of you able to test out the new GoodReads app for Android? I’ve been using it for at least a couple of weeks now. Even though I’m not a heavy GoodReads user I have noticed several improvements from their old app including a new modern design, faster loading times and a much better search function.

The search function alone being fixed is enough to make me use the app more. Now the books suggested as I type actually find the books I am looking for instead of nonsense until I’m done tap typing the entire title. What was worse on the old app but is fixed on my new name was that GoodReads didn’t work with my SwiftKey app so I couldn’t swipe type titles and didn’t get keyboard suggestions.

I’m so glad GoodReads finally made their app easier to use.

The Gratitude Diaries

3/5 stars

I was skeptical about reading a book about gratitude from a woman who seems like she has it all, but after reading it I felt judgemental for going in thinking that Janice Kaplan had nothing to offer me. As it turns out, we all have our moments and we can all improve by practicing gratitude. Since reading the book I have brought daily gratitude into my life and I can feel a small positive impact already. Yeah, it’s all in my head, but where else would I want it to be?

Spark Joy

4/5 stars

I like this book much more than The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up. It was about the same length (from what I remember), but it was packed with more directive information, adorable illustrations and it was a little less oddball. I would say Skip The Life Changing Magic of Tidying up and just enjoy Spark Joy instead. You won’t miss out on anything important, I promise.

Discipline Equals Freedom Field Manual

3/5 stars

I kinda feel like a red-headed stepchild after reading this book, but I know my drill-sergeant stepdad only wants what’s best for me. I think it’s fair to note that this book is roughly 1/3 exercise plans which I had no interest in since I already have my fitness plans under control. Not an overly deep book but several little nuggets of “get up and go”.

School for Psychics

2/5 stars

Thank you to NetGalley and Simon Schuster for providing me with a free advanced copy of The School for Psychics in exchange for an honest review.

This is a paranormal book about Teddy Cannon, a Sanford drop out gambling addicted young woman who never knew her birth parents. A lot of this story walks side by side with Harry Potter and I found it difficult not to think of Harry Potter & The Sorcerer’s Stone several times throughout this book.

Both are raised by parents who are not theirs under the impression that their birth parents died in car accidents, both Harry and Teddy were collected to go to boarding school by someone in the field, whisked away to learn about their true powers. Neither Teddy nor Harry are particularly gifted an have to rely on friends to for backup.

Teddy is a lot less likable than Harry though and for several reasons. Firstly she’s a grown adult that acts like a child. At least Harry had the fact that he was eleven keeping him from harsher judgments on his choice of actions.  She’s careless and she squanders opportunities.  She’s a shit to her friends.  The only thing redeeming about Teddy Cannon is that she makes the right decision in the end.  And Teddy is just the main characters, let alone mentioning all the other characters that were either one dimensional or unlikeable or both.

School for Psychics is a fast-paced government conspiracy theory book wasn’t the worst fictional story I’ve ever read but it certainly wasn’t the best, either. This is an okay introduction to what I believe will be a series of books in the Whitfield Institute universe but I will not be reading the next.

To read my old book reviews please visit here until they have been migrated to TheNerdJournals.com

The Time Traveler’s Wife

4/5 stars

This is my second time reading The Time Traveler’s Wife; my first time reading it was when I was a young woman in the early aughts. A couple of days ago I decided that it was time for a reread, which I don’t normally do these days. (Why read old books when there are so many books I’ve never read before?)

So I picked up this book, a little skeptically- was it just a young woman newly in love who enjoyed this magical realism love story or was it truly a good book? I enjoyed the book again, of course, as told by the 4-star rating, but I can say that I didn’t like it AS MUCH as I did when I was young.

Sometimes I got a little confused on when things happened chronologically and I had to flip back a couple of pages and check (and recheck) the date. Sometimes I was appalled by the language and graphic sex scenes and I, by no means, consider myself a prude. But I still really enjoyed this story, even more than a decade after my first read.

The foreshadowing in this book was very well done, which of course I appreciated more on my second read than I did on my first; it was enough to cause me emotional goosebumps up and down my arms. I loved the art, the punk, the architecture, the clearing, everything. I loved it all. The high highs and the low lows of this love story that transcends time and death is still a beautiful love story.

All Rights Reserved

4/5 stars

I enjoy dystopian books that take a small nugget of current society like copyright durations being extended indefinitely (thanks, Walt Disney) and frivolous lawsuits and turn them to a chilling story about what could happen if taken to the extreme.

Speth, a fifteen-year-old girl makes a snap decision that rather than pay for her words she speaks, she will remain silent. Her only power in the system set up for failure is to not participate. This causes problems for not only herself but her family as well.

I was hooked on this book from start to finish, the only problem I had is that Spleth seemed to lack any strong emotion one way or another, which seems a little counter-intuitive for a girl so disillusioned by the world that she refuses to speak.

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